The Next Phase is Not Web 3.0

O'Reilly Media's Web 2.0 Summit, which took place over the last few days in San Francisco, got me thinking, why is the web still only in version 2.0? Tim O'Reilly himself coined the phrase Web 2.0 back in 2004 for his first conference of the same name. It was defined by an evolution in front end technologies like AJAX and bubble letters, back-end technologies like web services and RSS feeds, and business models like crowdsourcing and software as a service.

So given that we're 6 years in to Web 2.0, when will we get to Web 3.0? The answer is never. No one will ever start calling it Web 3.0. For one thing, it's not catchy. Web 2.0 has a certain ring to it that Web 3.0 doesn't. Also, I think it will be difficult for people to come to a consensus on when technologies have evolved enough to move to a new version number. Web 2.0 was coined by a single person. Web 3.0 would have to be more organic. We much more likely to describe future "versions" of the web in descriptive phrases rather than numbers.

Tim Berners-Lee has always been against this nomenclature anyway. His alternative to "Web 2.0" was the "Read/Write Web," because of the way in which users became empowered to contribute en masse to the data on the internet. And in 2006, when asked what Web 3.0 would be, he said that a component of it would be "The Semantic Web," or "a web of data that can be processed directly and indirectly by machines." In other words, a web in which the machines can glean meaning from the data, in addition to simply manipulating it.

But I would argue that we are already at the next evolution of the web, and yet it's not about semantics. It's about context. This new phase of the web has largely been catalyzed by two breakthroughs: advances in the power and reach of mobile computing, as well as what Mark Zuckerberg calls "the social graph." Both of these lend not meaning but context to data, and that is a very powerful thing.

Mobile devices can contextualize data around locations, photos, video, and audio (among other things). And of course the social graph connects data to people. The "Internet of Things," as it continues to grow, will increasingly connect data to objects (shall we call it the "object graph?"). Although context is a step in the direction of semantics, we are still a ways away from getting machines to the point where they can interpret meaning from this data.

Indeed the "web" isn't even about machines anymore. What was once a network of machines connected by wires is now a network of people, places and things connected by context. There is a new network growing atop the old.

Perhaps the semantic web will come in version 4.0 (although we still won't call it that). But I think the best characterization of the most recent evolution of the web is the "Contextual Web" (I am not the first to call it such). Twitter, Facebook, Foursquare, the iPhone, Android, and many other prominent technologies can fall under this term, and I think it best describes the current proliferation of mobile and social technology that is spawning so many new and interesting businesses.

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